APT has expanded to Tennessee!

Skills Addressed in Occupational Therapy:

 

Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs) addressed by occupational therapists include, but are not limited to:

  • Putting on and taking off clothing/jacket/shoes/socks
  • Grooming, such as washing and drying hands, brushing teeth, and brushing/styling hair
  • Manipulating fasteners (buttons, snaps, zippers)
  • Tying shoes
  • Bathing/showering self
  • Managing clothing and hygiene for toileting
  • Utilizing utensils to feed self
  • Drinking from an open mouth cup and straw
  • Opening packages
  • Participation in age-appropriate chores
  • Managing money
  • Meal preparation

Sensory Processing Skills addressed by occupational therapists include, but are not limited to:

  • Supporting modulation of sight (vision), sound (auditory), touch (tactile), taste (gustatory), body position (proprioception), and movement (vestibular) input
  • Eating various textures of food and tastes
  • Remaining attentive/engaged within a busy/noisy environment
  • Sitting and standing still as needed
  • Transitioning between tasks and settings
  • Tolerating unexpected or loud noises, smells, and bright light
  • Allowing grooming (haircuts, washing of hair, nails being cut, brushing of teeth etc.)
  • Wearing various forms of clothing (jeans) and shoes and socks
  • Tolerating messy play
  • Regulating activity level in order to attend

Bilateral Coordination Skills addressed by occupational therapists include, but are not limited to:

  • Opening packages/containers
  • Shifting/turning paper to cut with scissors
  • Stringing beads/lacing
  • Folding paper
  • Catching a ball
  • Spontaneously crossing midline

Fine Motor Skills addressed by occupational therapists include, but are not limited to:

  • Establishment of a hand dominance
  • Ability to isolate index finger to point
  • Controlled grasp and release patterns
  • Manipulating items in the hand
  • Grasp on utensils in order to write, color, draw, and feed self
  • Utilizing classroom tools such as scissors, glue stick, stencils, glue bottle, hole punch

Visual Motor Integration Skills addressed by occupational therapists include, but are not limited to:

  • Drawing a person
  • Forming pre-writing strokes and shapes
  • Copying letters and numbers
  • Cutting on the line of various lines and shapes
  • Catching and kicking a ball

Visual Perceptual Skills addressed by occupational therapists include, but are not limited to:

  • Detects similarities and differences
  • Matching and sorting objects, pictures, and shapes
  • Identifying shapes
  • Ability to determine right versus left
  • Completing puzzles
  • Scanning left to right
  • Tracking a moving target
  • Ability to find a picture partially concealed
  • Finds object in a busy background

Handwriting Skills addressed by occupational therapists include, but are not limited to:

  • Writing name
  • Maintaining a dynamic grasp on pencil
  • Legibility, letter formation, spacing, and line orientation

Executive Functioning Skills addressed by occupational therapists include, but are not limited to:

  • Getting self ready in the morning
  • Managing emotions
  • Initiating activities in a timely manner
  • Controlling urges and impulses
  • Retaining information
  • Developing plans
  • Bringing necessary materials to and from school
  • Utilizing an organization system to track assignments, tests, and due dates
  • Being aware of how behavior affects others