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Commonly Used Physical Therapy ICD-10 Codes

 

R26 Series: Abnormalities of Gait and Mobility

When to refer:

This could be a child who walks on toes >50% of time at/after the age of 2yrs. Child whose feet turn out or in more than 10 degrees at any age. A child whose walking pattern causes trips/falls or inability to keep up with peers.

  • R26.2 Difficulty in walking, not elsewhere classified
  • R26.8 Other abnormalities of gait and mobility
    • R26.81 Unsteadiness on feet
    • R26.89 Other abnormalities of gait and mobility
  • R26.9 Unspecified abnormalities of gait and mobility

R62 Series: Delayed milestone in childhood

When to refer:

Child is not performing gross motor skills of that expected of peers due to medical diagnosis.

  • R62.0 Delayed milestone in childhood
    • Delayed attainment of expected physiological developmental stage
    • Late talker
    • Late walker
  • R62.5 Other and unspecified lack of expected normal physiological development in childhood
    • Developmental delay
    • Developmental delay, mild-moderate
    • Developmental delay, severe
    • Growth retardation
    • Lack of expected normal physiological development
    • Mild to moderate developmental delay
    • Physiological development failure
    • Severe developmental delay

F82 Series: Specific developmental disorders of motor function

When to refer:

Child is not performing gross motor skills of that expected of peers without an underlying medical diagnosis.

  • F82.0 Specific developmental disorder of motor function
    • Clumsiness
    • Developmental coordination disorder
    • Fine motor developmental delay
    • Gross motor development delay
    • Motor delay

Torticollis

When to refer:

Observation or parent report of consistent head turning or tilting to one side in any position. The earlier the referral, the more likely of earlier and full resolution per research on congenital muscular torticollis. Recommended referral by 3mo of age.

  • M43.6 Torticollis
    • Excludes: congenital (sternomastoid) torticollis (Q68.0) current injury – see Injury, of spine, by body region; ocular torticollis (R29.891); psychogenic torticollis (F45.8); spasmodic torticollis (G24.3); torticollis due to birth injury (P15.2)
  • Q68.0 Congenital deformity of the sternocleidomastoid muscle
    • Applicable To: Congenital contracture of sternocleidomastoid (muscle), Congenital (sternomastoid) torticollis, Sternomastoid tumor (congenital)
    • Approximate Synonyms: Congenital anomaly of right sternocleidomastoid muscle, Congenital anomaly of sternocleidomastoid muscle, Congenital deformity of bilateral sternocleidomastoid muscles, Congenital deformity of left sternocleidomastoid muscle, Congenital deformity of right sternocleidomastoid muscle, Congenital torticollis, Sternocleidomastoid muscle anomaly, Torticollis- congenital

M62.81 Muscle weakness (generalized)

When to refer:

Child struggles to keep up with peers, transition from one position to another such as floor to stand, or to maintain any posture. Child may frequently seek support through arms, other people, or surfaces. Also, observation or parent report of concern for inability to keep up with peers, pain with gross motor tasks, or difficulty to perform age-appropriate skills.

When to refer to Physical Therapy

A child might need physical therapy if he or she has trouble with physical skills limiting efficiency or safety at home, school, or community due to pain, joint mobility, weakness, atypical posture, or impaired balance or coordination. The skills of pediatric physical therapy practitioners are viewed as critical, since the longer a child goes without mastering the skills required for success and independence, the more the problem can compound as they get older. Included below is a list of developmental areas physical therapists address that may impact a child’s ability to engage in everyday mobility tasks if deficits or delays are present in these areas.